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CONGRATULATIONS JIMMIE

Posted by Digory Kirke on July 29, 2009

ON YOUR BACK TO BACK ALLSTATE BRICKYARD 400!

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Johnson's 2009 Brickyard 400 burnout

Jimmie kissing the bricks 2009Allstate 400Kissing the Bricks VictoryIndianapolis Motor Speedway

JJ Brickyard 400 2009JJ's 43rd career winNASCAR Indianapolis Auto Racing2009 AllstateWin_160x600

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Is the 4-Peat Next?

Posted by Digory Kirke on July 27, 2009

If Jimmie Johnson wasn’t sending all of us a message before, he certainly has done so now. Many  have been touting Tony Stewart to be this year’s eventual champion, but with his victory at this year’s race at the Brickyard, Johnson has firmly reminded us who he is and what he is capable of.

As if we could forget.

Seven out of the fifteen previous races at Indy have been won by that year’s eventual champion. We all know this. Therefore, don’t be surprised when it happens again this year. Why? It’s not simply because he’s Jimmie Johnson, the reigning champion and the only one we’ve had for the past three years. No, it’s because this is one of Johnson’s best seasons to date, which is pretty damn scary if you ask me. Just take a look at his three previous championship seasons up to Indy in comparison to this season.

2006

Points Position: 1st
Poles: 1
Wins: 4
Top 5s: 8
Top 10s: 17
Avg. Start: 10.6
Avg. Finish: 7.9
Laps Lead: 363
DNFs: 0

2007

Points Position: 9th
Poles: 4
Wins: 4
Top 5s: 9
Top 10s: 11
Avg. Start: 13.4
Avg. Finish: 15.2
Laps Lead: 763
DNFs: 3

2008

Points Position: 4th
Poles: 6
Wins: 2
Top 5s: 6
Top 10s: 10
Avg. Start: 8.9
Avg. Finish: 13
Laps Lead: 763
DNFs: 1

2009

Points Position: 2nd
Poles: 0
Wins: 3
Top 5s: 9
Top 10s: 14
Avg. Start: 9.9
Avg. Finish: 10.9
Laps Lead: 969
DNFs: 1

As you can see, only 2006 was better, unless you are speaking in terms of Top 5s and laps led. That’s why, unless you’re a Jimmie Johnson fan, you should be really nervous. And if that doesn’t make you nervous enough, remember this: Johnson only gets better from here on out. Starting around August, Johnson and the rest of the 48 team pick up the pace and by October, there seems to be no stopping them. If Johnson’s past is anything to go by, then we should all prepare ourselves for more NASCAR history. Come Homestead, the 4-peat could very well be a reality.

You may start your gulping now.

Oh yeah, one more thing..

BE AFRAID! BE VERY, VERY AFRAID!

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Johnson Kisses The Bricks Again At Indy

Posted by Digory Kirke on July 27, 2009

It’s not easy to win a NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race. In fact, it can be downright difficult.

While three-time NASCAR Sprint Cup Series champion Jimmie Johnson picked up his third Allstate 400 at the Brickyard victory Sunday afternoon before a sun-baked crowd of 180,000 at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Juan Pablo Montoya learned the hard way just how tough these victories are to come by. Montoya, who won the 2000 Indianapolis 500, was bidding to make history on Sunday and become the first driver to win both the 500 and the Brickyard 400. For the first 124 laps, Montoya looked like he had the field covered, leading a whopping 116 laps. But, Montoya was caught speeding entering pit road on lap 125 and had to serve a pass-through penalty, thus virtually eliminating any chance he had for the win.

While that was a tough pill for the fiery Colombian to swallow, NASCAR monitors pit road speed every race weekend and had already handed out 74 pit road speeding penalties heading into this race – that averages out to almost four pit road speeding penalties per race thus far. Montoya was clearly found to be speeding over two of the nine loops along pit road and he’ll have to try again next year to add a Brickyard 400 victory to his racing resume.

Johnson capitalized on Montoya’s penalty and led the final 23 laps of the race, holding off teammate Mark Martin for his 43rd career NASCAR Sprint Cup Series win. Toss in the fact that seven of the last 11 series champions have won this race and gone on to claim the title, and it bodes well for Johnson to make history in 2009 and earn a record fourth straight crown.

Indianapolis Motor Speedway is one of America’s sport’s landmarks. When you walk along pit road during pre-race festivities and look down at the sea of humanity on both sides of the front stretch, your heart starts pounding. Combine that with the names of the legendary drivers who have “kissed the bricks” and the chill bumps continue.

For Jimmie Johnson, it was another feather in his cap – a cap that is becoming increasingly covered up in significant achievements in this sport.

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Johnson Earns 3rd Victory at The Brickyard

Posted by Digory Kirke on July 27, 2009

Johnson's 2009 Brickyard 400 burnout

Jimmie Johnson does a burnout for the fans after winning the Allstate 400 for the second consecutive time.

Jimmie Johnson grabbed his second consecutive win at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway by taking the checkered flag in Sunday’s Sprint Cup Series event.

Johnson has won three of the past four races at the 2.5-mile track and is the first driver to win in consecutive years in 16 NASCAR races at Indy.

“It’s pretty special,” said Johnson, who now sits second in the driver point standings. “This track has been so tough on me over the years and to be able to win here now three times means the world to me. I wanted to race Indy cars as a kid growing up and some day hoped to race here and now to take three trophies out of here and go kiss the bricks is awfully special.”

Juan Pablo Montoya dominated the majority of the race, leading 116 of 160 laps before being penalized for speeding on pit road with fewer than 35 laps remaining. He served a penalty and dropped back in the field, opening the door for Johnson and other drivers to vie for the victory.

Johnson’s teammate Mark Martin quickly took the lead and led 10 laps before Johnson made a pass on Lap 137.  Johnson held off a hard charging Martin in the final 10 laps and led the field to the checkered flag.

“That was unbelievable,” said Johnson, who now has three wins this season. “I hope the fans enjoyed that race. I can’t say enough about this race team and all of Hendrick Motorsports. It was a fun battle with my teammate Mark Martin. Damn is he fast. For an old guy he had me pretty worried.

“Those last 15-20 laps we had to drive it so hard to stay ahead of the five. I was better in (turns) three and four than he was and he had me beat in (turns) one and two and it was kind of a give and take thing that was going on. Luckily we held him off. It’s great to work with him and work with Alan (Gustafson) and work with all my teammates at Hendrick Motorsports to get this Kobalt Tools Impala in victory lane.”

Johnson is 192 points behind Stewart in the driver standings. Jeff Gordon is now third with Kurt Busch and Carl Edwards rounding out the top five.

The next race on the Sprint Cup Series schedule is at Pocono Raceway. The race will be broadcast live on Sunday, Aug. 2 on ESPN at 1 p.m. ET.

Team No. 48 kisses the bricks after another Allstate 400 win at the Brickyard!

Team No. 48 kisses the bricks after another Allstate 400 win at the Brickyard!

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Brickyard History for Johnson

Posted by Digory Kirke on July 27, 2009

Brickyard History for Johnson

Johnson scored his 43rd career win.

Jimmie Johnson became the first driver to score back-to-back Allstate 400 at the Brickyard victories on Sunday when he held off Mark Martin for his third career win at Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

Johnson didn’t take the lead until lap 137, but stayed ahead of the field the rest of the way to notch his third win of the Sprint Cup Series season.

Johnson’s lead was inherited when disaster struck Juan Pablo Montoya, who dominated the race and led 116 laps nearly making history by becoming the first driver to win the Indianapolis 500 and Allstate 400 at The Brickyard.

But Montoya was caught speeding on pit road on lap 125 during what would have been his final regular stop of the day for fuel and tires, ending his quest to make the record books.

“If they do this to me, I’m going to kill them,” Montoya said on his radio. “There’s no way. I was on the green. Thank you NASCAR for screwing my day. We had it in the bag and they screwed us because I was not speeding. I swear on my children and my wife”

But NASCAR’s rule stood and Montoya was shuffled back to the 12th spot on the impending restart, out of contention for the win.

That left Johnson and Martin to fight for the victory at the front of the field. When the green flag flew, Johnson was able to nose his Lowe’s Chevrolet ahead of his Hendrick Motorsports teammate and despite a couple of runs in the final two laps from Martin was able to easily take the record-breaking checkered flag.

“That was unbelievable,” Johnson said. “I hope the fans enjoyed that race.”

Although Martin closed to within two-tenths of a second in the waning laps, he was unable to get alongside the race leader.

“For an old guy, he had me pretty worried,” Johnson joked. “Those last 15 or 20 laps, we had to drive so hard to stay ahead of him.”

Martin was shooting for his fifth win of the season but was forced to settle for the runnerup spot.

“He was better than I was off of 4, I was better than he was off 2,” Martin said. “I asked for a chance to be in the fray and [the team] gave me a chance. That’s all I asked for.”

Two-time race winner Tony Stewart was third with Greg Biffle and Brian Vickers rounding out the top five.

Kevin Harvick, Kasey Kahne, David Reutimann, Jeff Gordon and Matt Kenseth completed the first ten finishers.

It was a tough day for a group of drivers battling for a spot in the Chase. Denny Hamlin had a transmission issue early and was credited with an 34th place finish. Kurt Busch suffered a tire problem and limped home 27th.

And Kyle Busch suffered a cut tire to finish 38th, that dropped him to 14th in th standings with only six races to go to set the field.

The tire problems that plagued last year’s race were never a factor, as Goodyear made good on its promise to find the right compound for one of the biggest races of the season.

Goodyear tires last year couldn’t make it longer than 10-to-12 laps, and the tiremaker spent 11 months diligently correcting the problem, with drivers and teams giving the manufacturer high marks this weekend.

The NASCAR Sprint Cup Series now heads to Pocono Raceway on Sunday, August 2nd.

MY WORD: If Juan Pablo Montoya is going to make a comment like he did which is threatening towards the officials at NASCAR, I believe the sanctioning body of NASCAR ought to show Mr. Montoya the “door” (suspend) him for the rest of the season.

I don’t care how upset you are, who or whom or upset with, and or what driver it is and or you are there is no excuse for making threats like that. Montoya would not only be out of the rest of this season if it were up to me, but he’d be paying a fine that was so steep and or heavy he’d still be paying it by the begining of the 2010 season.

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Johnson becomes first to win back-to-back Brickyards

Posted by Digory Kirke on July 27, 2009

Jimmie Johnson isn’t apologizing for anything. So he didn’t have the fastest car. So he didn’t lead very many laps. So he wasn’t sure just what happened to race leader Juan Pablo Montoya.

So what? He knows one thing.

“I do know I have the trophy,” said a beaming Johnson on Sunday after winning NASCAR’s Allstate 400 at the Brickyard for the second straight year and third time in the last four years.

Johnson, the three-time defending Sprint Cup champion, won this time in improbable fashion.

Montoya had led 116 of the first 125 laps — including a Brickyard record 59 consecutive laps at one point — before he was penalized for speeding on pit road. That enabled Johnson’s Hendrick Motorsports teammate Mark Martin to grab the lead until the engine of Dale Earnhardt Jr. — another teammate — blew up on lap 129, causing just the third caution of the 160-lap race.

Once racing resumed, it took Johnson two laps to hold off Martin and win the race by .400 seconds. A deflated Montoya wasn’t a factor and finished 11th.

“The caution gave me a chance to really race with Mark on the restart,” Johnson said. “That was really my only opportunity. I did everything I could on that restart. It worked out. Mark put a ton of pressure on me.”

Montoya, also in a Chevy, led 116 laps, the most by a nonwinner of the Brickyard 400. But Johnson derailed Montoya’s bid to become the first driver in history to win both the Indianapolis 500 (in 2000) and the Brickyard.

“That would have been an amazing story,” said Johnson, who became the first to win back-to-back Brickyards. “I would have gone to victory lane to congratulate him. I would have been proud of him.”

But Johnson was even prouder of the 1-2 Hendrick finish after dueling Martin during the final, frantic laps in front of 180,000 fans at historic Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

“At the end, he was coming a little bit on me,” Johnson said. “Some laps, I’d do everything right to get a gap. Other laps, he’d do it right, close the gap. It just kept going back and forth.”

Martin, the pole sitter, has yet to win in 16 Brickyard starts. He had to settle for his second runner-up and 10th top-10 finish at the track.

“I was hoping to be in the fray, and we were definitely in that,” Martin said. “I drove my heart out and was grateful to have a chance to race for the win. But I got beat by a (Jimmie Johnson) Superman.”

The 43rd victory of Johnson’s Cup career moved him ahead of another Hendrick teammate, Jeff Gordon, into second place in the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship, 192 points behind leader Tony Stewart, who was third on Sunday.

Gordon, 15 points behind Johnson, finished ninth in the race.

“Jimmie drove the wheels off that car,” said team owner Rick Hendrick. “You know, any time you come to Indianapolis, it’s almost like sacred ground. To have an opportunity to win this thing, it’s just phenomenal.”

Hendrick had an inkling Johnson could win this race after a conversation Saturday night with crew chief Chad Knaus, whose crew built a new car and engine for the Brickyard.

“Chad said, ‘Don’t come up here expecting us to win … we’ll probably have a 10th-place car,’ ” Hendrick related. “I enjoy it when he tells me that because I know he’s (pulling) my leg.”

Johnson’s third Brickyard win ranks second in the race’s history to the four won by Gordon, whose last win at Indianapolis was in 2004.

“To win here is the coolest feeling ever,” said Johnson, who followed the winner’s tradition by kissing the yard of bricks at the start-finish line and took a victory lap with his crew piled on a shiny Corvette.

“To ride around that lap and absorb the energy of this place, the history of the track … at that point, you start thinking about what this place is, and what’s gone on here.”

And Johnson, 33, may not be done winning races at the track.

“It means the world to me,” Johnson said of his third Brickyard win. “As how I feel I fit in history … it’s something that comes down the road, as you get close to retirement. I’ve got a lot of years left in me. Hopefully four-, five-, six-time race winner here would be awfully cool.”

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Hendrick Motorsports’ Jimmie Johnson holds off teammate Mark Martin for Indy win!

Posted by Digory Kirke on July 27, 2009

Hendrick Motorsports' Jimmie Johnson kisses the bricks after winning Sunday's NASCAR Sprint Cup Allstate 400 at Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

Hendrick Motorsports' Jimmie Johnson kisses the bricks after winning Sunday's NASCAR Sprint Cup Allstate 400 at Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

Jimmie Johnson turned a pit-road miscue by Juan Pablo Montoya into his second consecutive victory in the Allstate 400 at Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

It was the third career win at the Brickyard for Johnson, driver of the Hendrick Motorsports No. 48 Chevrolet. He also became the first driver to post consecutive wins in the annual event.

Montoya led a race-high 116 laps, dominating the 20th stop on this year’s NASCAR Sprint Cup Series schedule. But the Earnhardt Ganassi Racing driver was flagged for speeding on pit road on lap 125, and fell from first to 12th.

“It’s absolutely a rip-off,” Montoya told his team over the radio. “I hope [NASCAR President] Mike Helton is listening to this, because you should double-check what happened because I got robbed.”

After Montoya’s misadventure, Johnson lined up second, on the outside, as the field regrouped following a blown engine by Dale Earnhardt Jr.

It took the three-time series champion barely a quarter of a lap to reel in teammate and race leader Mark Martin, and Johnson led the final 24 laps.

“That was unbelievable,” Johnson said. “I hope the fans enjoyed that race.”

Although Martin closed to within two-tenths of a second in the waning laps, he was unable to get alongside the race leader.

“For an old guy, he had me pretty worried,” Johnson joked. “Those last 15 or 20 laps, we had to drive so hard to stay ahead of [him].”

Martin, a four-time winner this year, started on the pole and led early, and 14 laps in all. But he couldn’t hold off Johnson’s advances in the final rundown.

“He was better than I was off of [Turn] 4, I was better than he was off [Turn] 2,” Martin said. “… I asked for a chance to be in the fray and [the team] gave me a chance. That’s all I asked for.”

Points leader Tony Stewart (Stewart-Haas Racing) finished third, while Greg Biffle (Roush Fenway Racing Ford) and Brian Vickers (Red Bull Racing Toyota) completed the top five. Stewart now leads Johnson by 192 points in the series standings.

Montoya, a previous winner at the Brickyard in the Indianapolis 500, appeared headed to adding the Allstate title. He led by more than five seconds on several occasions during the 160-lap event.

Afterwards, he appeared to still question the penalty call.

“It kind of sucks,” he said. “I was on the lights [under the speed limit] every time. … Once it happens, you can’t change it. It’s pretty frustrating.

“I was cruising. The car was stupid fast.”

Joe Gibbs Racing’s Kyle Busch, a three-time winner this season, took a big hit in the points battle when he cut a tire and collected the wall on lap 57. Although he returned to the race after extensive repairs, Busch finished 38th and dropped from 10th to 14th in the point standings.

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Johnson takes Breathless Brickyard Victory!

Posted by Digory Kirke on July 27, 2009

Jimmie Johnson won the Allstate 400 at the Brickyard for the third time in the last four years.

Jimmie Johnson won the Allstate 400 at the Brickyard for the third time in the last four years.

Juan Pablo Montoya dominated Sunday’s Allstate 400 at the Brickyard, where he led 116 of the first 125 laps, before a crucial mistake on pit road cost him the race and gave it to Jimmie Johnson, who won here for the third time in the last four years.

Montoya utterly dominated at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, leading by more than 5 seconds at times until being busted for being too fast exiting pit road on Lap 126 of the 160-lap race. That put Hendrick Motorsports teammates Mark Martin and Johnson in the first two positions, with Johnson taking the lead for the first time on a Lap 137 restart and staying out front for the final 24 laps.

In the process, Johnson, the three-time defending NASCAR Sprint Cup Series champion became the first driver to win consecutive Brickyards, his No. 48 Chevrolet Impala SS coming on strong at the end of the race when it mattered most.

Martin held on to finish second in his Hendrick Chevy, followed by Indiana native Tony Stewart in the No. 14. Stewart-Haas Racing Chevy,the No. 16 Roush Fenway Racing Ford Fusion of Greg Biffle and Brian Vickers’ No. 83 Red Bull Racing Toyota.

Montoya, after running out front for so long, ended the race in 11th.

It was an unlikely finish to a race that Montoya ran far out front for most of the afternoon in his Earnhardt Ganassi Racing with Felix Sabates Chevrolet.

Pole-sitter Martin took the lead at the start, with second-qualifier Montoya and Dale Earnhardt Jr. falling in behind. But at the end of the first lap, Robby Gordon spun at the exit of Turn 4 to bring out the first yellow of the day.

The race restarted on Lap 5, with Montoya and Earnhardt jumping into the lead, as Martin fell to fourth. The field quickly strung out single file, as is typically the case at Indy, and at the 20-lap mark, Montoya was 1.571 seconds ahead of Martin, Brian Vickers, Tony Stewart, Earnhardt and Jimmie Johnson.

Kevin Harvick pitted on Lap 29, kicking off the first round of green-flag stops. Montoya pitted on Lap 32, with Earnhardt, Johnson and others. Stewart came in a lap later. On Lap 33, Denny Hamlin slowed with a broken shifter and driveshaft, which dropped his Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota out of contention. During that sequence of stops, Kurt Busch had to make a second stop because of a loose wheel on his Penske Championship Racing Dodge and fell off the lead lap.

When the stops were completed, the order on Lap 35 was Montoya by 2.169 seconds over Martin, Vickers, Stewart, Johnson and Earnhardt.

Kyle Busch blew a right-front tire on Lap 58, hitting the Turn 4 wall and bringing out the second caution of the day. That sent the field down pit road for tires and fuel. Montoya and Martin held on to the top two spots under caution, emerging ahead of Vickers, Greg Biffle, Johnson, Earnhardt, Stewart, Kasey Kahne, David Reutimann and Bill Elliott.

The race restarted on Lap 63, Montoya easily holding off Martin on the double-file restart. Six laps later, Sam Hornish Jr. bounced off the wall lost a right-front tire on his Penske Championship Dodge, just after Michael Waltrip pitted with an overheating engine.

At Lap 80, the halfway point, Montoya had a 3.649 second lead over Martin and 4.516 seconds over Vickers. Then it was Johnson, Stewart, Biffle, Earnhardt, Reutimann, Kahne and Jeff Gordon. All told, Montoya led 74 of the first 80 laps.

Green-flag stops began on Lap 91, with Martin pitting on Lap 92 with teammate Johnson. Montoya followed on Lap 93, with Vickers also in then.

Once the stops were over, it was Montoya by 5.499 seconds on Martin at Lap 94, then Vickers, Johnson, Stewart and Biffle. That order was unchanged at Lap 100, though the margin was down a little to 4.559 seconds.

By Lap 120, the margin was virtually identical to what it was before, Montoya leading Martin by 4.338 seconds. Johnson was up to third by this point, ahead of Vickers, Stewart, Biffle, Kahne, Gordon, Earnhardt and Reutimann.

Five laps later, the final round of green-flag stops began, with Montoya pitting on Lap 126. But the 2000 Indy 500 winner was penalized for being too fast exiting pit road and had to make a pass-through penalty, dropping him to 12th. “I swear on my children and my wife I wasn’t speeding,” said a frustrated Montoya.

That put Martin and Johnson in the lead, ahead of Biffle, Stewart and Vickers. The third caution flag of the race came out on Lap 129, when Earnhardt lost an engine, necessitating a lengthy caution period that extended through Lap 136.

When the race restarted, Martin opted for the inside lane. As the track went green on Lap 137, Johnson jumped into the lead at the end of the frontstretch, with Martin settling into second place. And from there, Johnson was able to hold on to score a historic victory.

Martin began pressuring Johnson with five laps to go, the two Hendrick Chevrolets running in lockstep. But Johnson held on to win his third race of the season and the 43rd of his career.

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Jimmie Johnson makes History by kissing bricks Back 2 Back!

Posted by Digory Kirke on July 27, 2009

Jimmie kissing the bricks 2009

INDIANAPOLIS — Juan Montoya‘s loss was Jimmie Johnson‘s gain Sunday at Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

Capitalizing on a pit-road speeding penalty to the dominant car of Montoya — and on the outside lane on a restart with 24 laps left — Johnson held off teammate and pole-sitter Mark Martin to win his second consecutive Allstate 400 at the Brickyard and his third in the past four years.

Johnson staved off a last-ditched challenge from Martin through the first two corners at the 2.5-mile track and streaked across the yard of brick — the unique finish line at the Brickyard — .400 seconds ahead of Martin in a race that gave no hint of the chronic tire problems that punctuated last year’s event.

Montoya led 116 laps, more than twice the 57 combined he had led in 92 previous Cup starts, but ended the day frustrated in 11th place. Cup points leader Tony Stewart ran third and leads Johnson by 192 points with six races left before the 12-driver Chase is set Sept. 12 at Richmond.

Johnson moved past ninth-place finisher Jeff Gordon, who trails Stewart by 207 points. Greg Biffle came home fourth, followed by Brian Vickers, Kevin Harvick, Kasey Kahne and David Reutimann. Matt Kenseth ran 10th to hold the 12th and final Chase-eligible position in the standings by 68 points over Reutimann.

“Geez, was he fast,” Johnson said of Martin, 50. “For an old guy, he had me pretty worried. … Those last 15-20 laps, we had to drive it so hard just to stay ahead of the 5 [Martin]. I was better in [Turns] 3 and 4 than he was, and he had me beat in 1 and 2, and it was kind of a give-and-take thing that was going on. Luckily, we held him off.”

To Johnson, the last restart was critical. Martin chose the inside lane for the restart on Lap 137 of 160, and Johnson surged into the lead from the outside as the cars sped through the first two corners.

“Clean air was everything,” said Johnson, who won his third race of the year and the 43rd of his career. “You could only get so close to the car in front of you. … I got that restart and put on a great show for the fans. I hope they enjoyed it.”

Over the final green-flag run, Martin said he drove his car as hard as he could without wrecking it.

“I drove my heart out and gave it everything I had,” he said. “I’m just thankful that I had a chance to race for the win. I’m disappointed we didn’t win, but I got beat by (Jimmie Johnson) Superman.”

Montoya had a lead of more than 4 seconds when he came to the pits under green for tires and fuel on Lap 125. According to NASCAR, Montoya exceeded the 55 mph speed limit entering the pits and was preparing to serve a pass-though penalty when Dale Earnhardt Jr.’s engine exploded at the entrance to pit road, causing the third caution of the race.

The yellow flag saved Montoya from losing a lap, but Montoya was adamant he had not exceeded the speed limit.

“I swear on my children and my wife, I was not speeding,” Montoya radioed to crew chief Brian Pattie. “You know, I was being very conscious of that, you know what I mean?

“I’ve been robbed before, I’ve been screwed before, but [NASCAR] overdid themselves this week.”

Team co-owner Felix Sabates radioed Montoya in Spanish, trying to calm him. Pattie added his own words of caution.

“Dude, please — you’re making it worse,” Pattie said.

Montoya restarted 12th after the caution for Earnhardt’s blown engine and improved one position before the finish. By the time he climbed from the car, his attitude had mellowed somewhat.

“Once it happens, you can’t change it,” Montoya said. “So I’m pretty frustrated, but it shows where we’re going with the team.”

NASCAR said Montoya had been clocked in excess of 60 mph in two segments entering pit road (NASCAR allows a 5 mph tolerance). Sabates confirmed the data after the race.

Another agonizing finish put Kyle Busch in serious jeopardy of missing the Chase. On Lap 57, the right-front tire on his No. 18 Toyota blew as he rolled through Turn 3, sending the car hard into the outside wall.

Busch brought the car to the garage for extensive repairs and lost 46 laps in the process. He finished 38th and fell from 10th to 14th in the Cup standings, 82 points behind Kenseth.

“We were biding our time running there [in the seventh position], and I got stuck behind the 71 [David Gilliland] there and had to push the right-front a little bit,” Busch said. “Right from that point, I just started losing the right-front tire, just getting real tight.

“I had been loose the whole run, so I didn’t think I had been abusing it at all, but all of a sudden it just started vibrating, and then, in two laps, it just blew out.”

*SIDE NOTE: Not only did Jimmie Johnson become the first driver to make history by winning the Brickyard 400 back 2 back, he was also the first driver in the history of same said race to win while leading with ten laps left. No other driver has done this, every driver who has led with ten laps to go has lost this race. WAY TO GO JIMMIE! MAKING NASCAR HISTORY ONCE MORE! TWICE IN ONE DAY AND RACE NO LESS! THE ICING ON THE CAKE WAS WINNING AT INDIANAPOLIS MOTOR SPEEDWAY ON THIS THEIR 100th RACE ANNIVERSARY! EAT THAT SMOKELESS STEWART!

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Wins by Car Number

Posted by Digory Kirke on July 26, 2009

Have you ever wondered the history behind the number your driver has on his car each week? Personally, being a aspiring historian, I find any information about that past of this sport to be one of the most interesting aspects of NASCAR. Again, we can credit Jayski for the information I’m about to relay.

How many different car numbers have won in total?: 100. The 100th different number in victory lane was the no. 07 of Clint Bowyer at New Hampshire last year.

What numbers have never won a race ever?

02,03,04,05,08,09,35,36,39,50,
57,61,63,65,67,68,69,70,74,76,79,82,84,93,94,95

What number has the most wins all time? 43 with 198 win all together. The number 11 comes in 2nd with 184 total wins.

Out of the car numbers that have won so far this season, here is where they stand on the all time list:

11 ranked 2nd with 184 wins.
88 ranked 9th with 66 wins.
2 ranked 10th with 63 wins.
12 ranked 12th with 59 wins.
9 ranked 15th with 49 wins.
48 tied with the no. 8 ranked at 19th with 38 wins.
99 ranked 20th with 36 wins.
18 ranked 23rd with 31 wins.
31 ranked 44th and tied with several others with 6 wins.
07 ranked 47th tied with several others with 2 wins.

On this following link you can check out the chart that has wins by numbers, the all time rank. Also, there is a chart that has the very first winner in a car number and also the last winner in each number. So, check this link out!

Wins by Car Number

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